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Hand raised military macaw breeding center

breeding military macaw

The Military Macaw is an all-green parrot, with the exception of the red feathers above its beak and the blue flight feathers of its wings. Like all Macaws, they are large parrots. They have the bare white flesh on the face – a distinguishing feature of Macaws, which really sets off their dark beak. breeding farm Hand raised military macaw breeding center

Caring for a Hand raised military macaw breeding

In captivity, a parrot’s owner becomes the bird’s flockmate. This bird is not a pet that you can buy and ignore; these birds need interaction and mental stimulation. If you don’t oblige them, you will pay the price in wrecked property, bitten fingers, and frustration.2

The cage itself needs to be large—at least 2.5-feet by 3-feet wide and 5-feet tall. If you can, create a dedicated bird-safe room. Be sure to include a large perch inside the cage and have a play stand for time outside its home. The military macaw may become territorial with its cage; limit putting your hands in the cage while the bird is inside it.

You will need to clean the bird’s cage on a regular schedule. Clean the perches and toys once a week, wash the floor of the cage once a month, and thoroughly sanitize the rest of the cage once a year. Hand raised military macaw breeding center

Consider the costs of owning one of these parrots before rushing out to get one. Veterinary bills, quality feedtoys, and cages add up. If you can’t give your bird the best of everything, consider holding off on adopting one until you can.

Diet and Nutrition of Hand raised military macaw breeding center

In the wild, military macaws feast on seeds, berries, nuts, fruits, and vegetables. Pet military macaws should eat a similar diet made up of a high-quality seed or pellet mix and fresh bird-safe fruits and vegetables.

Macaw owners often find that their bird likes to join them for dinner. You can feed them nutritious “people food” on occasion, including small amounts of protein like chicken. If it’s healthy, natural, and generally considered “good for you,” it should be good for your bird as well. The exceptions are avocado, chocolate, and rhubarb, which are toxic to birds.

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